The Art of the Micro Coil: A Beginners Guide to Coiling an RBA

For new or less experienced vapers, RBAs can seem confusing and over-complicated.  I was there myself – I had just gotten into the world of variable voltage, and I was still using carto tanks and pre-coiled clearomizers. While they did work, I never felt fully satisfied because I knew there was a better way.

When I finally did decide to get into RBAs, I made the foolish mistake of starting out on an AGA T2, probably one of the more difficult genesis atomizers to coil. I got so frustrated during the process that I didn’t try to wrap another coil for weeks.

Then one day, I was perusing ECF and I discovered micro coils. I had a dead A7 that I burned out the stock coil on, and at the time I had no idea how to wrap my own coil, so it sat dormant in my vape box for months. I decided to choose it for my first ever attempt at wrapping a micro coil.

Within 5 minutes, I had my coil wrapped, attached to the A7 and wicked. As soon as I fired it up and took my first puff, it was like a lightbulb moment for me. The vapor was so much thicker, the throat hit better, and the clarity of the flavor had improved. All after taking a quick 5 minutes to wrap my own coil.

Once I had mastered that, I could coil nearly anything. That’s the great thing about the micro coil – the amazing versatility it has. You can pretty much use a micro coil on just about any atomizer out there that is possible to rebuild.

Most importantly, it is super easy to do, the materials are cheap, and once you learn how to wrap one yourself, you will be empowered to enter the next level of vaping, where you have complete control over the results.

So let’s dive in to how to actually wrap one of these:

What You’ll Need

  • Kanthal Wire – I use 28 gauge almost exclusively, and it is a perfect size for beginners in my opinion. This is the exact kind I buy, from Temco on eBay.
  • Something to clip the wire – I have used wire clippers, scissors and most commonly a nail clipper
  • Something to wrap the coil on. I strongly recommend starting out with a 1/16 drill bit which you can pick up at walmart for about $1.
  • Wick material – I strongly recommend using cotton. More on that later.
  • A basic pliers – I suggest needle nose
  • A rebuildable atomizer – You can definitely apply this to other types of atomizers like the Kanger Protank, but for starting out, a rebuildable dripping atomizer is by far the best way to go. I recommend an IGO-L, which you can pick up super cheap on Fasttech. They are very user friendly and perform flawlessly.

Wrapping the Coil

Ok. For this tutorial, I am going to assume that you followed my instructions and got yourself a 1/16th drill bit. It costs almost nothing to buy and it’s an invaluable tool in any vaper’s toolkit, so you need to get one – no excuses.

The difference between a Micro Coil and a regular coil is that all the individual coils are touching each other. If you ever look at the coil on a stock atomizer, you will see that it probably only has a couple of wraps, spaced out quite a bit. We want to do the opposite of that – more wraps, tightly touching. This will give you a lot more surface area on the coil for vapor to be created, and I think that having them all touching helps keep them consistently heated.

The hardest part of wrapping the coil is the first loop. What I do is take the drill bit, then wrap the wire over the bit 1 time, then pull the 2 ends together at the bottom so they are tight. This will help get you positioned so that the rest of your wraps are very close together. It should look something like this:

micro-coil-1

Sorry the picture is so shitty, but this should give you a pretty good idea. Now once you are at this point, grab the wire that is pointing away from you and pull it tight – then carefully wrap it around the drill bit 8 times. You want to keep a lot of pressure on it, so continue pulling it tight as you wrap it. This will help keep all the coils next to each other and uniform.

Once you have it wrapped 8 times, you should have a pretty tight coil wrapped with both legs facing downwards. It should look something like this:

micro-coil-2

Notice that there are a few slight gaps in mine. That’s ok.

Now depending on what device you are using, the next step will vary. Basically, we need to heat the coil until it glows orange, then compress the coils together with a pliers.

Method 1

If you are using an IGO L like I suggested, what I would recommend is that now you take your coil and attach it to the IGO-L.

Before you fire it, CHECK YOUR OHMS. You should always check your ohms before firing any atomizer if you value your face. If you did 8 wraps around a 1/16 drill bit, you should come out around 1 ohm. If you are using a variable voltage device, you might need to do more wraps – 12 or so to get the ohms high enough to fire. Otherwise you should be good.

Once you have checked your ohms, fire the device until the coil glows orange. Then take your finger off the fire button and quickly compress the coils with a pliers. DO NOT DO THIS WHILE FIRING YOUR DEVICE. It is no bueno.

When you are compressing the coil, you only need to apply light pressure. If the coil was heated until glowing, it should be a lot less springy and easily compress together to form a tight coil.

Method 2

If you are using something like a Protank where you can’t easily dry fire the device and then compress the coils, you can do it manually. Just slide the coil off of the drill bit and grab it by the end of one of the legs. then take a regular old lighter or any kind of fire producing device and hold it over the coil until it glows, then compress with a pliers.

Now that your coil is nice and tight, you are good to go. If you haven’t already attached it to your atomizer, go ahead and do that now and you are ready to apply the wick and start vaping.

Let’s Talk About Wicks

There are plenty of different wicking materials out there. The most common is Silica, and stainless steel mesh is also popular.

Personally, I don’t waste any time messing with either. I simply use plain old cotton.

Why Cotton?

Cotton is ideal for wicking. It can swell and absorb tons of juice. It’s a lot more pliable than silica so it makes it vastly easier to thread your coil, and it’s available damn near anywhere. Flavor wise, it doesn’t carry much of it’s own flavor – unlike silica which I think has a noticeable taste.

Just head over to your local CVS and pick up a bag of Sterile Cotton Balls for around $1.00 and you will have a lifetime supply of wicks. Plus you will never have to worry about sourcing the niche wick products that you can’t just head over to your local walmart and buy.

The main reason for cotton, especially for beginners is because it is just so easy to work with.

My first microcoil I wrapped, I wicked with silica and the hardest part of the process was threading the silica through the coil. With cotton, you don’t have to worry about that at all.

Diameter

There are different schools of thought on the correct diameter for a coil. Personally I like to choose between basically 3 different sizes for 90% of my builds.

Those 3 sizes are:

Large – I use a 3/32 drill bit for these. They aren’t that much bigger than the 1/16, but they are bigger. This provides more surface area and has no real drawbacks. I use larger sized coils most commonly on drippers and genesis style atomizers.

Normal – Normal for me is the 1/16 size. It is a great all around diameter to use. I almost always use 1/16 for Protanks and other BCCs. It works well for Dragon Coils. I really like it on Kayfun style devices because the drill bit will fit perfectly into the airhole making it super easy to do a chimney coil. It’s a great all around size and will work with anything.

Small – These work best for builds where the wick is wrapped around the outside of the coil rather than threaded through it. For a small build, I usually use a straightened paperclip. At 28ga Kanthal, you will need quite a few wraps, but these things can pack a crazy punch and produce a lot of vapor. I don’t use this size as much, but it does come in handy from time to time.

There are plenty of other ways you can go with diameter, but I find that most of the coils I wrap are one of those 3.

Types of Atomizers to Use with Micro Coils

Really, the possibilities are endless. In fact, there is rarely a build I do that doesn’t have a micro coil. I basically use them for every single build I do. The main thing I change from build to build is how the wick is wrapped.

That said, I have used micro coils specifically in: Protanks, BCCs, Genesis Atomizers, Kayfun Style Atomizers, Taifun GT and GS, Dripping Atomizers, Hybrid mods and Reverse Genesis Atomizers.

The possibilities are endless.

The Bottom Line

If you are planning to get serious about vaping, this is something you need to know how to do. It will save you tons of money, give you the confidence you need to be able to tinker with and troubleshoot your devices, and it’s actually pretty fun wrapping your own coils.

For me, this was the ONE thing I needed to learn to get to that next level of vaping where I really started to feel comfortable working with basically any atomizer I wanted without being afraid that I wouldn’t know how to build it.

If you haven’t tried to build your own coil yet, take a few minutes, wrap one up and see what a difference it makes!

57 comments on “The Art of the Micro Coil: A Beginners Guide to Coiling an RBA

  1. Gary says:

    So, heres the thing. Ive used every kind of rba there is and all the basic sizes of kanthal as well as many different types of wicks and I while I do find that cotton is the best by far, I often still struggle with knowing what ohm to use in certain atomizers and most of all… whats the right amount of cotton to use. Seems like I get a bad taste sometimes and I CAN never decern the difference between a good build and a bad one other than the taste. Everything else will seem perfect. So its gotta be the amount of cotton I think. That or the size of my coils. i dunno, but I wish I could get consistancy. I dont have anyone else that vapes to compare methods with as its just me that vapes out of people I know, although Ive been vaping for a year and a half

    Heres a question for you. What size coil, what type of kanthal, and how much cotton do you find optimal for an aqua build?

    • sam says:

      Hey Gary,

      Cotton can definitely be an issue. For most of my builds, I tend to run a basic wick-through-the-coil setup, and it really only requires a very small amount of cotton. So for starters I would suggest trying to do a basic coil and dial way back on the cotton – take about as much as you think you need and then tear about half of it off. You can always add more if it is too little, but I have rarely ever had a build where there wasn’t enough cotton.

      For the Aqua, it’s interesting you asked because I have had the same wick/coil setup on my Aqua since I got it back in November and it has been working really good for me.

      Mine is at 1.1 ohms right now, and I used 30 gauge kanathal with micro coils. I would guess there are probably about 10-15 wraps per coil. Cotton goes right through the wick and trimmed short.

      For a mech, that is a solid setup for the Aqua.

      If I was going to coil it up again for a variable wattage setup, I would probably aim for about 1.8 ohm. In fact, I will probably do a tutorial on this sometime soon.

      I have recently found that 30 gauge Kanthal works way better than 28 gauge on non-drippers. I have had plenty of working builds with 28ga, but they tend to end up giving dry hits MUCH easier than 30ga – this is true of practically any kind of tank setup – Kayfun, Taifun, Aqua, Protank, etc.

      • gary says:

        Yeahi try not to use much cotton, which is even more aggravating on a taifun with the direct wicking like it is. Anyway i also find 30 works better than 28 in most all rbas so I tend to use it the most. Heats up quicker to, i actually got my aqua kicking ass today, its running .65 right now (with some barley and candy from plume room) and wickimg.fine

  2. Lj says:

    i have been vaping a few weeks and quit smoking. i at one point came across micro coils and have built one that works but i am very confused. For one why will something explode if too low to fire? Second is i can only get my coil to about 1.0 resistance with my mini protank 2. i have an itaste vv 3.0 that the voltage goes from 3.3 to 5.0 and wattage goes from 6.0 to 11.0. what should i be vaping on or is that a too low of a ohm coil? if so how do i make one higher. Or is this battery just not one to use with micro coils? sorry if these questions sound foolish but im a noobie when it comes to this because im new to the vaping community. i would greatly appreciate a reply. thanks

    • lizz says:

      So you gave a few questions of varying topics:

      Exploding: Using unprotected (non coated batteries) or Cobalt (chem mix in li-on batteries) vs. Magnesium (safer chem mix in batteries) while running sub-ohm coils (below 1.0 ohms) is dangerous, as is stacking batteries (2 X 18350′s to produce higher amperage draw). That being said people still do it. You can google “thermal runaway” or “mech mod rocket mode” and see people intentionally fiddling with a battery to make it explode. If you stay away from cheap chinese batteries and inprotected batteries for a mech mod you should be fine. Sony and Efest batteries (with an mAh of 2300 or higher) will keep you within acceptable ranges, to be sure LEARN OHM’s LAW and APPLY IT!!
      Moving on to VV/VW Devices:
      all of the above is if you are running a mechanical mod (basically a battery tube with very little to no wiring, a battery and a tank which you build the circuit for). You are using a device that has safety features built into it. Most of these VV/VW devices WILL NOT FIRE below a certain ohm threshold (usually .7-.9 ohms) and have an addtional feature of a 5-10 second continuous drawn shutoff (holding the button for longer and the device automatically stops firing. As far as the voltage and wattage go those pretain to the way the device draws power. The simplest terms i can put this in is this of you device like a car. Voltage is an automatice and wattage is a manual trasmission. Voltage will give you a consistent draw/burn no matter what juice, build etc. Wattage you have to tinker with to find that sweet spot of fog vs. flavor, for each and every juice and build. One is not better than the other, it is purely a matter of personal preference (as is most of vaping).
      Being a noob is NBD becuase you are asking questions. Better safe than sorry, and most people (myself obviously included) that vape are passionate about it and love to talk about it. I hope this helps you in your vaping adventure!!

  3. Lj says:

    oh and im using 28 g a1 kanthal awg. as what it says on my shipping order

  4. Lj says:

    posted wrong email sorry haha i changed it

  5. Lj says:

    i no longer see the comment i tried making because i used the wrong email i apologize. but i said that i am using 28 g a1 kanthal awg and can only get 1.0 resistance with the protank 2. i am a noobie and new to the vaping community so i need some clarification. why would something explode if it is too low to fire? Also i am using an itaste vv 3.0 with 3.3 to 5.0 voltage and 6.0 to 11.0 wattage. is 1.0 ohm micro coil too low? if so how can i make one higher or is my battery just not good enough for micro coils. id greatly appreciate an answer. thanks

    • sam says:

      Hey LJ, If you are using an iTaste, you shouldn’t have to worry too much about your battery exploding. When you use an unregulated device, it doesn’t have any protection in place to prevent the device from firing if you try to draw more amps than your battery is rated for. The iTaste is regulated and you wouldn’t be able to fire an atomizer if the ohms are too low. I believe 1 ohm coils will work on an iTaste, so you should be OK with your protank at that level. However, you can always add a couple more wraps to your coil to bring your ohms up. Also, for Protanks I prefer a 30 gauge Kanthal to 28 gauge, as I find you will have less trouble with dry hits, and you can achieve higher ohms with a smaller coil.

      • Lj says:

        Thanks a lot for the clarification. I have searched for the past few days for answers like these and all I really find are explanations on how to make the coils. I will look into getting the 30 gauge instead. Theres just one thing I noticed is the tank got hot quick with my 1.0 coil I made and was concerned as to why that was occuring. One thing I do not undertstand is for example with the protank it comes with the little peice of paper showing 1.7-1.9 ohm next to voltage showing from 3.1-3.3 volts. Is this what your should be vaping on? Or is it how much it uses on the battery, and i don’t understand this because there isn’t an explantion in the itaste manual or this paper that comes with the protank. Does it matter what voltage or wattage my 1.0 ohm coil is vaped on besides if it were to high i could get a burnt taste? Or does it not really matter. Thanks again I cannot tell you how much I appreciate you helping me out as I am trying to understand this and it just seems discouraging if there is noone to explain these things but im glad i found this website to help me.

        • sam says:

          I wouldn’t worry too much about the tank itself getting hot as long as it is hitting well.

          I would totally ignore the chart that came with the Protank.

          Basically you kind of need to feel your way through it. If you start getting hot/dry hits, you probably need to turn down the voltage/wattage. If you aren’t getting a big enough or hard enough hit, you probably need to turn it up.

          For a 1 ohm coil, you would probably be OK around 3.7 volts. If you want to go higher, you could try at maybe 4.2 and see if it is hitting too hot or not.

        • Marc says:

          Hey Lj, I have an itaste MVP 2, my wife has a itaste vv2 and we both use mini protank 2′s. I wrap our coils right now with 28 gauge around a 1/16 screw driver shaft 9x’s which gives me 1.2 ohm coils. I thread our coils with peaches and cream yarn, on a piece of yarn there are 4 strands i pull 1 strand to the side and thread the other three together through the coil. This setup works good but with itaste units at 1.2 ohms it will fire and work but at that low your control functions do not really work(I know it looks like they do but trust me its not). That is why i have 30 gauge coming in the mail. With the itaste units in order to have full control over your volts or watts you coil can not read below 1.5ohm. I hope this helps in your journey to findthe right vape for you.

        • Marc says:

          also in order for this type of set up to work properly and not get dry burns you have to drill out your air hole to a min of 1/16, i like mine at 3/32.

        • Marc says:

          all 3 holes not just one.

  6. Mike says:

    I just finished rebuilding a coil using 28ga kanthal and 3mm silica. 8 wraps is a tight fit but I got 2.5 ohms. I also use 32ga kanthal on 3mm silica, 6 wraps and consistently get 2.3 ohms. These work great in my Protank 2 and Protank 2 mini. I use a paperclip to rest the silica on when I wrap.

  7. Matt says:

    Hi.
    Could I ask what would be the best number of wraps and amount of cotton for 30 gauge, Igo-W on a VW iTaste 134. Thanx.

    • sam says:

      Hey Matt, if you are wrapping a microcoil, I would suggest trying 12 wraps of 30 gauge kanthal on a 1/16th drill bit. If you are using something wider than 1/16, then you will want to do a couple less wraps. Ideally you would have some way of checking the ohms – they should come out somewhere between 1.5 and 2 ohms. As long as the device will fire on an iTaste 134, then you should be good to go. It has protections in place that won’t let you fire it if the ohms are too low.

      • Matt says:

        Thanx. Your site has been more valuable than 100 others. I had a 3/32 bit, so I wrapped 10 times. According to my multi-meter it was around 1 – 1.1 ohms after subtracting the meter itself. The problem is it takes the coils like 4 or 5 seconds to turn red. The flavor is great and it’s a fairly nice pull. But there’s just not as much as I’d like and am trying to get. Maybe when I get a mech that would solve that. Thanx again.

        • sam says:

          A mech could help, but you should still be able to get a decent hit from your 134. Couple things- first, make sure you have your wattage cranked up. You can easily run at full wattage with a dripper -just keep the wick wet.

          Second – you have to make sure your airhole is legit. If you’re using the stock Igo-W with one airhole – usually the hole is really small. If you’ve only got the one hole, I would definitely recommend drilling that out to at least 1/16th and up to 3/32 if 1/16 is still not working for you.

          Then also make sure you have the airhole positioned so it’s right over the coil.

  8. Aaron says:

    I just want to say thanks for the tutorial. Great information! I’ve been looking into building my own coils for a few days and this is by far the best information I’ve come across. I just ordered 100′ of 30g A1 kanthal and 150′ of organic cotton yarn and am looking forward to building my own coils. This site has given me many ideas on how I want to try to thread my coils and the information on how many wraps and the actual diameter that the wraps should be. I just want to say thanks again! Keep up the good work in sharing this valuable information!

    • sam says:

      Hey Aaron, that’s awesome. You will really like wrapping your own coils once you get used to it. I would suggest you try cotton balls in addition to cotton yarn. You might still like the yarn better, but I personally really like cotton balls.

      • Aaron says:

        Sam, I just wrapped my first few coils tonight and none of them are really giving much of a hit. I’m using an aro pyrex bottom coil tank with 8 wraps on a 1/16 and 7 wraps around a 3/32 bit. I have a variable voltage winder battery that goes up to 4.8v (I usually stick around 4-4.4v) if that’s any help. What types of voltages are you guys using? Also how tight do I want the wick to be? The coils I was buying were about 8 wraps and the wire looks to be the same, but I’m sure it was silica that was used.

        • sam says:

          It kind of depends what gauge kanthal you are using. It sounds to me like you are using a higher gauge kanthal. Using anything above 30 gauge can significantly decrease performance. For an ARO, I would personally probably use 30 gauge and shoot for as close to 1.5 ohms as you can get. I wouldn’t guess you could fire anything below 1.5 ohms on a winder.

          The voltage can really vary depending on the build. You kind of have to feel it out and find the voltage that works best for you based on the build you have. Once you have done this for a while, you should get a better feel for it.

          If you are using cotton for a wick, it should be relatively tight inside the coil.You don’t need to force it in because it will swell once you saturate it, but you should be fine with a relatively snug fit.

          There’s definitely nothing wrong with what you are doing, however I think you might find that it is easier to get a feel for this if you picked up a cheap rebuildable dripping atomizer to practice on. It’s should be a lot less complicated to work with than an ARO. A winder isn’t really an ideal battery for rebuildables either – at least not for beginners. If you have a way of measuring your ohms, I would suggest looking at a cheap mechanical mod like the JM22 – I have a review of it on this site. If you don’t have a way of measuring your ohms, you might want to look at a better VV/VW device like an iTaste MVP or SVD that can fire lower ohm builds and is more suitable as a mod.

          Either way, you should be able to get it working on your current setup – it just might take some more practice to get it dialed in to your liking. The one thing you definitely want to do is make sure you are using either 28 or 30 gauge kanthal.

  9. Pete says:

    Is a 1.5mm drill bit fine instead of 1/16 and a 2.5mm instead of a 3/32? Going to order a cheap set.

    • sam says:

      Yeah that should work pretty well for you. 1.5 mm is just a tiny bit wider than 1/16 and 2.5 is just a little more narrow than 3/32, but it should be totally fine.

      • Pete says:

        Thanks, bought some drill bits and 28 gauge. Couldn’t really get enough wraps with the 32 whilst keeping the ohms low. Great guide, thanks! Waiting for FastTech haha!

  10. Laurie says:

    I too am just starting to drip-vape. How often do I need to change my cotton and redo my coils?

    • sam says:

      It’s really up to you. For example I have some pieces that I literally haven’t changed the cotton on in months, and I have some that I change the cotton out every day or two – although that is largely due to changing juices.

      When I switch up juices, unless I currently have a really mild juice in there, I will usually take out the cotton, dry fire the coil until it glows orange, then blow off any excess ash and thread a new piece of cotton through. That should kill most of the flavor from the previous juice. You can also run over the deck and chamber with a q-tip and rubbing alcohol if you have a really strong flavored juice in there, and let it sit for about 10 minutes before rewicking.

      If you don’t care to change your cotton often, you can probably get by using the same wick for quite a long time. The best way you can tell when you HAVE to change it is if it starts tasting burned or giving you dry hits.

      As far as the coils go – they can last indefinitely, especially if you clean them off every once in a while. Just like I said above, if you take out the wick, dry fire the coil until it glows, and then remove any excess ash before threading a new wick, you can pretty much get your coil to last as long as you need it to.

      The only reason you would ever really NEED to redo your coil is if it breaks, becomes warped to the point where you can’t thread cotton through, or if it becomes so gunked up that dry firing it still won’t get it clean.

      • LAJRIE says:

        Sam….thanms for taking time to answer. Your explanations are spot on. also, I seem to have to put more juice in every 4,or 5 hits. Is this normal?

        • sam says:

          How often you need to drip depends largely on how much cotton wick you are using, and how it is configured, and also the resistance on your coil and how hot you are firing it. I am actually planning on doing a more in depth tutorial on wicks really soon. There are lots of ways to do it, some better than others, and it can depend on the type of device you are using also.

  11. Ryan says:

    Hi Sam,

    First of all nice guide. I just wanted to ask.. how many wraps do i need to get to .8 ohms in a dual microcoil with a 30g kanthal and can i use my itaste vtr to check ohms since my ohm meter is not working at the moment.. thank you…

    • sam says:

      Hey Ryan, you can definitely use your VTR to check ohms. That should work fine for you.

      If you’re doing dual coils, you will need to get each coil to about 1.6 to give you a 0.8 ohm overall.

      With 30 gauge kanthal, I would try doing 6 to 7 wraps for each coil. I think that should get you pretty close.

  12. Pete says:

    Vice guide thanks – can’t seem to get the coil to stick together using a lighter – by the time I squeeze it with pliers its no longer red. Ordered a butane torch to try that instead. I find working with 28 gauge so much easier than springy unruly 32 and also more customisable in terms of ohms.

    • sam says:

      Yeah it is going to be much harder to get a 32 gauge coil to stick closely together.

      90% of the time, at least, I don’t heat my coil with a lighter first. I attach it to the RDA, then dry fire it until it glows orange, then pinch it together with a pliers. With 28 gauge kanthal, that is basically what I do every time.

      I did just recently get some ceramic tipped tweezers which are nice because you can pinch the coil together while you are firing it, however with a basic microcoil it almost seems like overkill.

  13. eric says:

    I have been wrapping 28 AWG A-1 10 wraps and I keep getting 2.11 ohms? Can anybody tell me if you do less wraps do you get lower ohms? I am using a Kayfun lite plus on a mechanical Mod. I have 32 guage for my protank 3′s. Would 32 awg work well on a Kayfun. Do lower ohms mean a stronger hit? Thanks.

    • sam says:

      Yes to both – less wraps for lower ohms, and lower ohms for a stronger hit. I have found that if you go below 1 ohm on a kayfun you might experience some wicking issues. You could definitely use 32 gauge on any device instead of 28 gauge. With 32 gauge you need less wraps to make higher ohms.

      • eric says:

        Thanks Sam.. Appreciate it!!!

        • Matt says:

          Excellent guide. I have gone .6 on my Kayfun Lite+ v2, and it was the best vape with my Kayfun yet. BUT, it did take the third time of me wicking it to get it right. And it was a major juice hog. A Kayfun tank bout every 2hours or so of normal vaping. …So yes, I would say also that around 1ohm would be the sweet spot. Just wanted to add my experience.

  14. Sam.C says:

    Hi sam, great page and great replies to people who have been asking what i have been wanting to ask.

    Just a quick one from me, I’m using IGO-L on MVP 2.0 (nemesis on order)

    when i make the coils I’m doing say 7 wraps on 32G and getting about 1.5.. I’ve got the coil almost touching the posts because I’ve heard that having the legs too long will mean they heat up first..

    With some research i see people using longer legs so he coil is nearer to the air hole in the side..

    what do you recommend.. because my vapour is a bit limited to what i have seen around.

    also my coils tend to sit a bit higher one side than the other, due to the nature of one leg coming from bottom of coil and one coming from the top.

    Thanks,

    Sam.

    • sam says:

      Personally I don’t really worry too much about the distance between the coil and the posts as long as the coil isn’t touching either the top cap or the posts. That said, I guess somewhere right in the middle is probably the best place to aim for. People do talk a lot about hot legs, however in my experience, I have rarely ever had a problem with hot legs on a dripper- that is something a lot more common with genesis style atomizers, so I wouldn’t really worry about it. You can always place a little cotton under the legs if you really need to and that will be all you need to keep them from getting too hot.

      If you are still having trouble with vapor production, I would definitely suggest that you try widening the airhole if you are using the stock airhole. I would start at 1/16 and if that still isn’t enough move to 3/32. Then make sure the airhole is always aligned right over the coil.

      Also, I’m not a super big fan of 32 gauge kanthal either on drippers. You might have more luck if you try 28 gauge or at least 30.

      • Sam.C says:

        Got ya. I’ve read your tutorial about coiling the IGO-L so when i’m back on dry land in a few weeks will give it a shot.

        With regards to the hole size, its not a tight draw as it is… but should i go for it anyways? 1/16 isn’t much bigger than it is already i think?

        Thanks, i will order some 28 and some 30 so its waiting for me when i am back.

        • sam says:

          1/16 isn’t a ton bigger than the stock hole, but it should make some difference, and as long as you have any kind of drill and a 1/16 drill bit it only takes a second to do, so it’s a good starting point. 3/32 is probably the next size up and it will give you a much more airy draw,

  15. Dick Wiley says:

    Sam, thanks for an excellent guide on coil building; the best I’ve seen. Just received some 28 & 32ga wire and a Kayfun.The coil that came with the Kayfun looks crummy compared to yours. I see that you like 28 & 30ga – is 32 also acceptable, or should I stick with 28? Also plan to use cotton. Thanks for your much-needed advice.

    • sam says:

      Yes as a matter of fact I just built a very basic coil with 32 gauge the other day to test and it has been working really well for me. On a Kayfun, you should have no problem at all with 32 gauge, and I actually think lower gauge can help avoid dry hits.

  16. Blaine R. says:

    I’ve got an overall of .445 ohms on my meter between both coils. My question is… On my TOBH atty attached to my magneto running an 18650 what is the lowest safe ohm range I can have without devastating the battery? I’m using 28ga kanthal around a paperclip about 9 times getting about 1.3-1.4 ohms on each. I’m getting a huge cloud but I’m wondering what kind of stress it’s putting on my equipment.

    • sam says:

      It basically depends on the type of battery you have. Do you know what kind you have? For a .4 ohm coil, you would want to make sure you have a battery rated for 30 amps. If you don’t, I wouldn’t want to see it any lower than .8 ohms at a minimum.

  17. Paul says:

    Brilliant Article. Well wrote and very informative. Well done indeed.

  18. Trish Considine says:

    Absolutely brilliant guide. Don’t need to ask anything now because all my questions have been answered above! Cheers from Ireland!!

  19. Lula says:

    Sooo anyone work with a Kraken at all? I’m have some issues with wicking. :/

  20. Nick Nicholas says:

    Really great, well written, and easily understandable guide, thank you for sharing your expertise. This may be a dumb question, what’s the best technique for threading cotton through the coil?

    Thanks again!

    • sam says:

      It’s really a pretty simple process. What I do is tear off a small chunk of cotton. Then I roll it a little in my fingers until it appears close to the same diameter as the coil. Then roll one end to a fine point. Slowly thread the fine point through the coil. If you can pull it all the way through with no resistance, then you rolled it too thin. Normally it will be on the thicker side, and while pulling it through you should get to the point where you encounter enough resistance that it won’t go any further without forcing it. Once this happens you can leave it as-is if you feel like you’ve got it in there good enough. If you want to keep threading it through, you can roll the thick portion with your fingers while gently pulling the short end farther through.

  21. Jon says:

    Great info. I have a stupid question.I see people do this before coiling. Why do i need to heat up the wire with a hand torch? Is that necessary?

    • sam says:

      Some people do it because they claim it makes the wire easier to work with. There’s no real reason why you would have to do it – I personally don’t bother.

  22. Noel Gonzalez says:

    Hello I had a question and I was hopeon you whould be able to answer it for me. I recently baught a stillare clone for 20$ and I baught a 26g kanthal wire for it in the box of the stillare it came with a smaller gauge wire and worked perfectly I than made a coil from my 26g wire and it Dident fire at all I even blew out on of me small battery’s so I was wondering why Isent it working with a thick gauge?

    • sam says:

      You need to be measuring the ohms of the coil you build before you fire the device. For example if you compare 5 wraps of 32 gauge kanthal and 5 wraps of 26 gauge kanthal, the results are going to me markedly different.

      Get a cheap ohm reader or pretty much any decent APV will be able to read ohms.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>